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Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus - Symptoms & Treatment


Vancomycin resistant enterococcus is a bacteria (germ) that causes bad infections. It is also called VRE. Enterococci live in your stomach, and usually only cause infection when you are not well. Enterococci are normal inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract. Other major sites of colonization that may act as reservoirs for enterococci in hospitalized patients or nursing home residents include wounds and chronic decubital ulcers (pressure sores). Enterococci are seldom found in pure culture in wounds, but when they are, the wounds usually have no clinical evidence of infection. Generally, enterococci are present in mixed culture in soft tissue wounds.Instruments such as electronic thermometers have been implicated in spreading this organism. Enterococci are also hardy organisms, which allows them to survive well on environmental surfaces.

VRE is a major health concern for caregivers. Instruments such as electronic thermometers have been implicated in spreading this organism. Asymptomatic women may also carry enterococci in high numbers in their vaginas, while 60% of men in hospitals may carry enterococci in their perineal or meatal areas VRE may infect many different parts of your body. VRE is part of a growing number of bacteria that have mutated (changed) over the years. These bacteria cannot be killed by a powerful antibiotic medicine called vancomycin. Dishes and utensils can be washed in a dishwasher or with warm soapy water and rinsed. Bed linen and clothing can be washed in a washing machine using a standard detergent for clothing. Resistant enterococci have been isolated from surrounding areas of infected patients.

Causes of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus

Common causes of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus

  • Infection.

Symptoms of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus

Common Symptoms of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus

  • Red, warm skin around the infected area.
  • Fatigue (being very tired) or not having any energy.
  • Fever.
  • Nausea (upset stomach) and
  • Vomiting (throwing up).
  • Pain and redness at the infection site.
  • Swelling or drainage at the infected site.

Treatment of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus

Common Treatment of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus

  • Depending on how bad your infection is, your caregiver may need to do surgery.
  • Draining any fluid or pus that has collected in your infected area. This fluid makes your pain and infection worse. Your caregiver will numb the area and make a small incision (cut). Depending on how much fluid is in the infected area, your caregiver may decide to leave the area open.
  • Ampicillin is the therapy of choice for enterococcal infections.
  • Proper handwashing is the most important way to prevent the spread of VRE and many other infections.
  • Ample paper should be used for cleansing and good handwashing afterwards is essential.
  • Environmental cleaning.
  • The bacteria is destroyed during the normal laundering process and all garbage can be put out for regular pick-up.
  • Clients with VRE should not be restricted from moving freely throughout their home and the community. If the client is incontinent of feces, proper diapering is essential.

 

 

 

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