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Enterobiasis - Symptoms & Treatment


Enterobiasis is the medical condition of being infected with pinworms. Pinworm infection is a large intestine infection and the infection is also called enterobiasis.Worms are transmitted from person to person by ingesting eggs (oral-fecal route), or through contact with contaminated bedding, food, or other items. Pinworm is the most common worm infection in the United States. Medical name for the pinworm is Enterobius vermicularis. The pinworm is about the length of a staple. It lives for the most part within the rectum of humans. Female pinworms leave the intestines through the anus and deposit eggs on the skin around the anus. Pinworm infection often occurs in more than one family member. Adults are less likely to have pinworm infection, except mothers of infected children. Ingestion of eggs, larvae eventually hatch in the small intestine and worms then mature in the colon. Female worms then migrate to the anal area, especially at night, and deposit their eggs. This may lead to itching and sometimes infection of the involved area.

E vermicularis infection is known to occur worldwide. Less common symptoms range from upset stomach to loss of appetite, irritability, restlessness, and insomnia. Pinworm infection are caused by the female pinworm laying her eggs. Eggs become infectious within 6-8 hours and, under optimum conditions, remain infectious in the environment for up to 3 weeks. Because of the short incubation time until the ova are infectious, eggs that are deposited under the fingernails during scratching and then placed in the mouth may be a mode of reinfection. Worms can be found in stools or on the patient's perineum before bathing in the morning.

Causes of Diphtheria

Common causes of Diphtheria

  • Worm(Enterobius vermicularis)
  • Contaminated bedding.

Symptoms of Diphtheria

Common Symptoms of Diphtheria

  • Itching.
  • Irritability.
  • Sleep disturbance.
  • Weight loss.
  • Vaginal irritation.
  • Infection.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Restlessness.
  • Insomnia.

Treatment of Diphtheria

Common Treatment of Diphtheria

  • Usually a single tablet of mebendazole (Vermox) is used for treatment.
  • Good personal hygiene with emphasis on washing hands after using the bathroom and before preparing food is essential.
  • Enterobiasis may be treated with over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Treatment involves a two-dose course.
  • Avoid scratching the infected area (around the anus) as this contaminates the fingers and everything else that they subsequently touch.
  • Washing hands before meals and after use of the toilet, keeping fingernails short and clean, laundering

 

 

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