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Sinusitis - Symptoms & Treatment


Sinusitis is an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses which may or may not be as a result of infection from bacterial fungal viral allergic or autoimmune issues. Our sinuses are the moist air spaces within the bones of the face around the nose. When a mucous membrane becomes inflamed, it swells, blocking the drainage of fluid from the sinuses into the nose and throat, which causes pressure and pain in the sinuses. Sinuses can become blocked during a viral infection such as a cold, and sinus inflammation and infection can develop as a result. Diagnosis of acute sinusitis usually is based on a physical examination and a discussion of your symptoms. If you have chronic sinusitis, you may have difficulty breathing through the nose, experience frequent headaches and tenderness in the face or aching behind the eyes. Allergies are a common cause, and anatomical problems such as a deviated nasal septum can bring on chronic sinusitis. Other suspected causes include mold or fungi in the sinuses. Most cases of sinusitis are acute, meaning they resolve in less than four weeks. However, when the condition recurs or endures longer than 12 consecutive weeks, you've developed a case of chronic sinusitis.

Acute bacterial sinusitis is an infection of the sinus cavities caused by bacteria. Bacteria and fungus are more likely to grow in sinuses that are unable to drain properly. See an illustration of a blocked sinus passageway. Unlike a cold or allergy bacterial sinusitis requires a physician's diagnosis and treatment with an antibiotic to cure the infection and prevent future complications. Chronic sinusitis is one of the most commonly diagnosed chronic illnesses in the United States, affecting 30 million to 40 million Americans each year. Chronic sinusitis can be a miserable condition that significantly impairs your quality of life. Sinusitis symptoms last longer and get worse after 7 days. There are two types of sinusitis: acute (sudden) and chronic (long-term). With chronic sinusitis, you're never really free from symptoms and always have a low level of sinusitis symptoms.

Causes of Sinusitis

The common Causes of Sinusitis :

  • Sinusitis can be caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
  • It can be caused by growths in the nose.

Symptoms of Sinusitis

Some Symptoms of Sinusitis :

  • Vomiting mucus.
  • Dry cough.
  • Tenderness around the cheeks or eyes .
  • Bad smelling mucus.
  • Swelling or aching around the eyes.
  • Blood in the mucus.
  • Morning headache.
  • Redness in the nose.
  • Low fever.
  • Trouble sleeping.

Treatment of Sinusitis

  • The goal of treatment is to help the sinuses drain and if needed, cure the infection.
  • Use a cetaminophen or ibuprofen to ease pain. Do not use aspirin.
  • Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics. Have your child take the full prescription. Antibiotics are usually given for 10 days. They may be needed for as long as 4 weeks.
  • The doctor may need to take tests.
  • Allergy medication will not cure sinusitis.
  • In cases of chronic sinusitis that are caused by problems with the way the nose is formed or caused by growths in the nose, surgery may be needed. These cases are rare.
  • Your doctor might recommend using nose drops, a nasal spray, a decongestant, or an antihistamine.

 

 

 

 

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