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Hepatitis - Symptoms & Treatment


Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver. Inflammation causes soreness and swelling. The hepatitis B, C, and D viruses can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection is prolonged, sometimes lifelong. Lack of blood supply to the liver, poison, autoimmune disorders, an injury to the liver,  and taking some medicines can cause hepatitis. People infected with hepatitis can experience effects ranging from mild illness to serious liver damage. Many recover completely from an infection, while others become carriers of the disease and can spread it to others unknowingly. For kids, hep A is the most common type of hepatitis to get. The virus lives in poop (feces) from people who have the infection. Vegetables, fruits, and shellfish (such as shrimp and lobster) also can carry hepatitis if they were harvested using contaminated water or in unsanitary conditions. When diagnosed and treated early, however, autoimmune hepatitis often can be controlled with drugs that suppress the immune system. Yet these medications, which often must be taken long term, carry a number of risks and aren't always effective. liver transplant may be an option when autoimmune hepatitis doesn't respond to drug treatments or in cases of advanced liver disease.

Hepatitis is usually characterized as viral hepatitis or non-viral hepatitis. Although the reason for this isn't entirely clear, some diseases, toxins and drugs may trigger autoimmune hepatitis in susceptible people, especially women. Most viruses, however, do not primarily attack the liver; the liver is just one of several organs that the viruses affect. There are several hepatitis viruses; they have been named types A, B, C, D, E, F (not confirmed), and G. As our knowledge of hepatitis viruses grows, it is likely that this alphabetical list will become longer If you have acute hepatitis, you might have nausea, vomiting, fever and body aches. Most people get over the acute inflammation in a few days or a few weeks. When the inflammation doesn't go away, the person has chronic hepatitis.

Causes of Hepatitis

The common Causes of Hepatitis :

  • Infections from parasites, bacteria, or viruses (such as hepatitis A, B, or C)
  • Immune cells in the body attacking the liver and causing autoimmune hepatitis
  • Liver disease can also be caused by inherited disorders such as cystic fibrosis and Wilson's disease, a condition that involves having too much copper in your body; the excess copper deposits in organs like your liver.
  • An overdose of acetaminophen, which is rare but deadly
  • Liver damage from alcohol, drugs, or poisonous mushrooms

Symptoms of Hepatitis

Some Symptoms of Hepatitis :

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Low grade fever
  • Fatigue
  • General itching
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • Abdominal pain or distention
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite

Treatment of Hepatitis

  • There are no medications used to treat hepatitis A because it's a short-term infection that goes away on its own.
  • Hepatitis B can sometimes be treated using medications. Four drugs are approved for use in adults with hepatitis B, but there hasn't been enough research yet on their use in children. However, you can talk to your child's doctor about a drug that may be available in some centers on a research basis for children.
  • A liver abscess requires intravenous antibiotic therapy directed toward the most likely pathogens and consultation for possible surgical or percutaneous drainage.
  • Hepatitis A can be diagnosed by a blood test called IgM anti-HAV.
  • People usually recover on their own after 2 or 3 weeks of bed rest.

 

 

 

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