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Cerebral Contusion - Symptoms & Treatment


Cerebral contusion latin contusio cerebri a form of traumatic brain injury is a bruise of the brain tissue. Like bruises in other tissues cerebral contusion can be caused by multiple microhemorrhages small blood vessel leaks into brain tissue. Surrounding the brain is a tough, leathery outer covering called the dura (door-a). Within the brain are (cranial) nerves that are responsible for many activities, such as eye opening, facial movements, speech and hearing. The brain is cushioned by blood and spinal fluid. There is very little extra room within the skull cavity. When the brain bounces against the skull, there is twisting and/or tearing of blood vessels and other brain matter.  Contrecoup injuries usually result in edema (swelling).  If the bleeding is extensive the contusion will lead to  hematoma (a collection of blood).  Both edema and hematoma can lead to permanent brain damage or death. The frontal and temporal lobes of the brain are where contrecoup contusions most often occur, which explains why people who have had contusions often have problems with reason, attention span, emotions and memory. The most common causes of contusion include a blow to the head from a motor vehicle crash, fall or assault. People at higher risk are those who have difficulty walking and fall often, those who are active in high impact contact sports and people who are taking blood thinners, such as coumadin.

Symptoms of Cerebral Contusion

Some Symptoms of Cerebral Contusion :

  • Headache
  • Depression
  • Slurred speech
  • Change in personality
  • Increased drowsiness
  • Confusion about the time or date
  • Memory loss
  • Change in pupils
  • Restlessness
  • Irritability
  • Nausea, vomiting

Treatment of Cerebral Contusion

  • Surgery to control bleeding in and around the brain
  • Monitoring and controlling intracranial pressure
  • Insuring adequate blood flow to the brain,
  • Treating the body for other injuries and infection

 

 

 

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