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Alcoholism - Symptoms & Treatment


Alcoholism is an illness marked by drinking alcoholic beverages at a level that interferes with physical health, mental health, and social, family, or occupational responsibilities. You may continue to abuse alcohol despite serious adverse health, personal, work-related and financial consequences. Alcoholism is one of the world's most costly drug use problems; with the exception of nicotine addiction , alcoholism is more costly to most countries than all other drug use problems combined citation. This is known as "alcohol abuse," which means you engage in excessive drinking that causes health or social problems, but you aren't dependent on alcohol and haven't fully lost control over the use of alcohol. Although some people are able to recover from alcoholism without help, the majority of alcoholics need assistance. With treatment and support, many individuals are able to stop drinking and rebuild their lives. According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, almost 18 million Americans abuse alcohol. Each year more than 100,000 Americans die of alcohol-related causes. Alcohol is a factor in nearly half of all U.S. traffic deaths. A person's risk for developing alcoholism can increase based on the person's environment, including where and how he or she lives; family, friends, and culture; peer pressure; and even how easy it is to get alcohol.

Alcoholism is characterized by a preoccupation with alcohol and impaired control over alcohol intake. Alcoholics are in the grip of a powerful "craving," or uncontrollable need, for alcohol that overrides their ability to stop drinking. The chemistry of alcohol allows it to affect nearly every type of cell in the body, including those in the central nervous system. Although cirrhosis of the liver is the best known complication, there are numerous physical effects to the digestive system, pancreas, nerves, and heart. In some cases alcoholism may actually be a symptom of an underlying condition such as depression or schizophrenia . While alcohol use is required to trigger alcoholism, the majority of the population can drink alcoholic beverages with no danger of suffering from it. After prolonged exposure to alcohol, the brain adapts to the changes alcohol makes and becomes dependent on it. The severity of this disease is influenced by factors such as genetics, psychology, culture, and response to physical pain.

Causes of Alcoholism

The common Causes of Alcoholism :

  • Established behavior patterns.
  • Peer pressure.
  • Broken relationships.
  • Depression.
  • Inheritance.
  • Genetics.
  • Schizophrenia.
  • Environment.

Symptoms of Alcoholism

Some Symptoms of Alcoholism :

  • Drinking alone .
  • Need for morning alcoholic drink.
  • Shaking in the morning.
  • Confusion.
  • Inability to stop drinking.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Abdominal pain.
  • Numbness and tingling.
  • Making excuses to drink.
  • Drinking too much alcohol.
  • Drunkenness.

Treatment of Alcoholism

  • Common medical problems related to alcoholism are high blood pressure, increased blood sugar, and liver and heart disease.
  • Effective treatment is impossible unless you accept that you're addicted and currently unable to control your drinking. '
  • Anticipating the possibility of relapse and addressing high-risk relapse factors
  • Treatment may begin with a program of detoxification, usually taking about four to seven days. You may need to take sedating medications to prevent delirium tremens or other withdrawal seizures.

 

 

 

 

 

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