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Cytomegalic Inclusion Disease - Symptoms & Treatment


Cytomegalic inclusion disease is caused by infection from the cytomegalic virus, a type of herpes virus that can lie dormant after initial infection and then reactivate periodically throughout life. The cytomegalovirus is a virus found universally throughout the world that infects between 50 to 80 percent of all adults in the United States by the age of 40. Intrauterine infection of the fetus is a very serious, often lethal, condition that affects a small proportion (about 5-10%) of infants whose mothers contract the infection during pregnancy. The virus can be transmitted from person to person through transplantation of infected organs or through the exchange of body fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva, breast milk, semen, and cervical secretions. An infected pregnant woman may not display any symptoms. However, the fetus of a mother with CIBD is at risk for problems, including lung disease, bleeding, anemia, liver damage, or brain damage. Cytomegalic inclusion disease is also known as giant cell inclusion disease, cytomegalovirus infection, and salivary gland disease.

Causes of Cytomegalic inclusion disease

The common causes and risk factor's of Cytomegalic inclusion disease include the following:

  • Infection from the cytomegalic virus, a type of herpes virus.
  • Drug exposure-oxytocin, sulfonamides, aspirin.
  • Transplantation of infected organs and exchange of body fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva, breast milk, semen, and cervical secretions.
  • Significant weight loss after birth.
  • People with suppressed or impaired immune systems.

Symptoms of Cytomegalic inclusion disease

Some sign and symptoms related to Cytomegalic inclusion disease are as follows:

  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Bone pain.
  • Fever and chills.
  • Dyspnea.
  • Swollen lymph glands.
  • Mental retardation.
  • Mild hepatitis.
  • Tender lymph nodes.

Treatment of Cytomegalic inclusion disease

Here is list of the methods for treating Cytomegalic inclusion disease:

  • For people undergoing organ transplants, AIDS patients and other individuals with immunosuppression, specific antiviral drugs, such as ganciclovir or valganciclovir may be used.
  • Physicians recommend good hygiene and thorough handwashing to prevent transmission of the disease.
  • A sustained-release ganciclovir implant has been shown to control disease in the implanted eye (but not elsewhere).
  • High titer immunoglobulin (IVIG, CytoGam) is also used in acutely infected individuals with some impaired immunity.

 

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