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Condylomata Acuminata - Symptoms & Treatment


Genital warts are also called condylomata (con-dih-lo-muh) acuminata. It is caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Genital warts are soft, moist, or flesh colored and appear in the genital area within weeks or months after infection. It is a Transmitted Disease. Genital warts vary in size and may even be so small that you can't see them. In women, genital warts may grow on the vulva and perineal area. Genital warts are single or multiple growths or bumps that appear in the genital area, and sometimes are cauliflower shaped. Genital warts may be as small as 1 to 2 millimeters in diameter - smaller than the width of a ballpoint pen refill - or may multiply into large clusters. There are more than 70 different types of HPV. Several types are associated with genital warts. Other types are associated with common or flat warts elsewhere on the skin.

Genital warts are very contagious. In rare cases both adults and children are infected indirectly, for instance through the use of an infected towel. Most people who acquire those strains never develop warts or any other symptoms. They can also develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has had oral contact with an infected person. Most people who have a genital HPV infection do not know they are infected. Not everyone with the genital wart virus will have signs of disease. You may have painless wart-like growths on or in your organs or around your anus (butt). The warts may vary in size and be bumpy or flat. Some types of HPV cause common skin warts, such as those found on the hands and soles of the feet. These types of HPV do not cause genital warts. Babies can also be infected during delivery. In children younger than 3 years, genital warts are thought to be transmitted by modes such as direct manual contact.

Causes of Condylomata acuminata

The common causes and risk factor's of Condylomata acuminata include the following:

  • Human papilloma virus.
  • Medical conditions that suppress the immune system.
  • Having another transmitted disease.

Symptoms of Condylomata acuminata

Some sign and symptoms related to Condylomata acuminata are as follows:

  • Men and women with genital warts will often complain of painless bumps, itching, and discharge.
  • Raised "warty" appearing tumors on the genitals.
  • Several warts close together that take on a cauliflower shape.
  • Genital sores (female).
  • Increased dampness or moisture in the area of the growths.
  • Warts in more than one area are common.

Treatment of Condylomata acuminata

Here is list of the methods for treating Condylomata acuminata :

  • Medications for home use include podofilox gel or solution, and antiproliferative compounds.
  • Imiquimod, a topical immune response cream which can be applied to the affected area.
  • Physician administered treatments include acid applications (bichloroacetic acid or trichloroacetic acid) and interferon injections with antiviral mechanisms.
  • Topical treatments to eradicate the lesions include trichloroacetic acid, podophyllum, and liquid nitrogen.
  • If warts are large, the doctor may carefully "freeze" them off by using a chemical or laser treatment to remove them.
  • Surgical treatments include cryosurgery, electrocauterization, or surgical excision.

 

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