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Clark Melanocytic Nevus - Symptoms & Treatment


Clark melanocytic nevus are benign neoplasms or hamartomas composed of melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells that constitutively colonize the epidermis. Histological architecture is very important in the pathological diagnosis of Clark (also known as atypical or dysplastic) melanocytic nevi. Melanocytes are derived from the neural crest and migrate during embryogenesis to selected ectodermal sites (primarily the skin and the CNS), but also to the eyes and the ears. These can be congenital, but most are acquired after birth. They vary greatly in appearance. They can be flat, elevated, smooth, rough, polyp-like, or sessile.  Melanocytic nevi occur in all mammalian species and are especially common in humans, dogs, and horses. Several forms of secondary proliferations can arise in congenital nevi on rare occasions. Although some of these closely resemble melanoma both clinically and histologically, metastasis is rare. Patients with Clark melanocytic nevus have an increased risk of developing melanoma within lesional skin. Nevi are potential precursors of malignant melanoma and are important risk factors for the development of the disease. Childhood may be a critical time for the formation and evolution of nevi.

Causes of Clark melanocytic nevus

The common causes and risk factor's of Clark melanocytic nevus include the following:

  • Exposing the skin to sunlight.
  • Nevi are potential precursors of malignant melanoma and are important risk factors for the development of the disease.
  • Patients with congenital melanocytic nevi.
  • Some genetic factors.
  • Family history of clark melanocytic nevus.

Symptoms of Clark melanocytic nevus

Some sign and symptoms related to Clark melanocytic nevus are as follows:

  • Clark melanocytic nevus generally begin to appear in adolescence, most often on the back, chest, abdomen, buttocks, and scalp.
  • Development of irregular or notched borders.
  • Colored in varying shades of tan and brown.
  • Bleeding and/or ulceration.
  • Larger than ordinary nevi, averaging about 1 centimeter in size.
  • Itching, ulceration, and pain in a pigmented lesion.

Treatment of Clark melanocytic nevus

Here is list of the methods for treating Clark melanocytic nevus:

  • Punch excision can be used for relatively small lesions.
  • The only safe way to remove an atypical mole is to have it cut out.
  • Wear a broad-brimmed hat when outdoors.

 

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