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Androgenetic Alopecia - Symptoms & Treatment


Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), is caused by androgens in genetically susceptible women and men. In men, this condition is also known as male-pattern baldness. It is characterised by progressive, patterned hair loss from the scalp. Hair is lost in a well-defined pattern, beginning above both temples. This genetically determined disorder is progressive through the gradual conversion of terminal hairs into indeterminate hairs and finally to vellus hairs. The pattern of hair loss in women differs from male-pattern baldness. In women, the hair becomes thinner all over the head, and the hairline does not recede. Androgenetic alopecia in women rarely leads to total baldness. Androgenetic alopecia appears different in men as compared with women. In men with Androgenetic alopecia, hair loss occurs in the fronto-temporal regions and on the vertex of the scalp, depending on severity.

Androgenetic alopecia in men has been associated with several other medical conditions including coronary heart disease and enlargement of the prostate. It is found in men and women of every ethnicity, every race. A variety of genetic and environmental factors likely play a role in causing androgenetic alopecia. Although researchers are studying risk factors that may contribute to this condition, most of these factors remain unknown. The incidence and the severity of androgenetic alopecia tend to be highest in white men, second highest in Asians and African Americans, and lowest in Native Americans and Eskimos. Male pattern baldness is indicated by the pattern of hair loss and a family history of hair loss. In women, androgenetic alopecia is associated with an increased risk of polycystic ovary syndrome. There have also been breakthroughs in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

Causes of Androgenetic Alopecia

The common causes and risk factor's of Androgenetic alopecia include the following:

  • Androgenetic alopecia, is caused by androgens in genetically susceptible women and men.
  • Genetic factors.
  • A history of androgenetic alopecia on either side of your family increases your risk of balding.
  • Chemicals used for dying, tinting, bleaching, straightening or perming.
  • Certain drugs used to treat gout, arthritis, depression, heart problems and high blood pressure may cause androgenetic alopecia in some people.
  • Excessive hairstyling or hairstyles that pull your hair too tightly
  • Taking birth control pills also may result in androgenetic alopecia for some women.

Symptoms of Androgenetic Alopecia

Some symptoms related to Androgenetic alopecia are as follows:

  • The hair loss seen with male pattern baldness usually starts on the top of the head, toward the back; on the sides; or near the front.
  • Complete baldness rarely occurs in women.
  • Scaling and pain.
  • The hair at the crown also begins to thin.
  • One or more round or oval bald patches.

Treatment of Androgenetic Alopecia

Here is list of the methods for treating Androgenetic alopecia:

  • Minoxidil promotes hair growth by lengthening the growth phase of hair follicles and causing more follicles to produce hair.
  • A medication called spironolactone is also sometimes used in women.
  • Ointments and creams can also be used, but they may be less effective than injections.
  • Injections of cortisone into the scalp can treat alopecia areata.
  • Doctors sometimes prescribe corticosteroid pills for extensive hair loss due to alopecia areata.
  • Surgical options may also be considered in some cases.

 

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